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News Last Updated: Oct 18th, 2006 - 15:18:42


Toddler Terrorist?
By Lauren Waddell
Oct 18, 2006, 15:17

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It’s hard to imagine that a four year old boy could be a threat to national security, but the Transportation Security Administration isn’t taking any chances.
Sam Adams is a small boy more interested in fire trucks than regime overthrow. But according to a KCFM San Diego report, Adams shares a name with someone that the TSA has flagged as a potential terrorist, resulting in serious travel problems for his family.
“It’s difficult, especially traveling at the holidays, because all the flights are completely full,” said Ted Adams, Sam’s father. “We get to the airport early because we know this problem’s going to be there, but it seems like no matter how early we get there, we aren’t guaranteed a seat.”
The Adams family is not the only one with this problem. There are more than 44,000 names on the “no-fly” list, including such common monikers as John Williams and Robert Johnson.
The director of the Terrorist Screening Center says that it’s a regrettable inconvenience for people with flagged names to have to go through heavy screening, but it’s the price necessary to protect national security.
“They ought to come up with a system where if your name is on the list and you can prove that you are not the terrorist, you can be placed on the list that says yes I’m Sam Adams, but I’m not Sam Adams the terrorist,” Ted Adams said.

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